Trinity One 3 in 1 Brewer review

Coming from the other side of the world (New Zealand), I tend to be interested in innovative new products that get exported over here and for a while now, I’ve had my eye on the Trinity One that was designed by Mark Folker in Brisbane, Australia (still the southern hemisphere…) and I’ve wondered where to get it from in the UK.  A while back I saw them on kickstarter, and they obviously they got a good response!

Joyfully I found out Coffee Hit here in the UK are now distributing them, so I got my barista hands on an early edition to preview and review for you!

The Trinity One (I’ll shorten it to just ‘Trinity’ in this blog) is essentially a 3-in-1 filter coffee brewer, that looks reminiscent of an ‘espresso’ machine because it comes with a ‘portafilter’ handle, which is pretty cool. It triples as a pour over V60/chemex brewer, Press Brewer (like an Aeropress), and small batch cold brewer (see end of blog for quick easy recipe).

The portafilter handle has a few functions, so it’s not just for a cool look! When you turn the handle left or right, it actually opens and closes a valve, which holds or releases brewed coffee through into your vessel. How the Trinity works is that you put your coffee in the chamber and pour hot water in either using the pour over method, or like an aeropress, fill the chamber with hot water, initially making sure the porterfilter valve is closed to first saturate the coffee and water. Then using the Trinity T-shaped 2.25kg weight to ‘press’ the water through, open the valve and it will press automatically.

The T-shaped (3kg) weight is actually what I think makes this brewer unique and innovative because it forms an airtight seal against the chamber wall allowing an even, clean press, every time.  Which means a more consistent brew!  Even though I really love the Aeropress, sometimes I have to really press hard on it and I’ve had a couple where the rubber seal has gone sticky for some reason ( I think I left it in the sun…). But with this Trinity, I don’t even need to touch it, because of physics, it automatically presses the coffee through into my cup (or jug)!

And while we’re on the geeky-train, the metal frame of the Trinity is made of powder coated matte-black carbon steel, which makes it durable – and I know how cycle geeks love a bit of carbon steel! Ha!

At first I was unsure as to how to measure the water, but there is a line in the clear chamber which measures to about 250ml, perfect for one cup. If you want a stronger or weaker brew, you can amend your dose or fill above or below the line. Also the chamber is made of really durable BPA-free plastic so it can withstand high pressure and temperature, and doesn't give you any nastys - better than glass!

When you’re finished with the brew, just twist the porter filter out - similar to as you would on an espresso machine. The T-shaped weight actually pushes down on a detachable ‘n-cap’ which pops off when you take the handle out. The coffee puck will be neatly packed in the handle for you to take away and discard. It is brilliantly clean! I was super surprised with how clean the chamber is after brewing, so the clean up is minimal! I literally just wiped the bottom of the chamber and threw the grinds out. Done.

What I think is great about this brewer is that you can, not only consolidate all your coffee paraphernalia into one brewer, but it also looks slick as heck. The bamboo finish is a classy touch too. I guarantee if you have a friends over for dinner, it’ll be a topic of conversation because it has a really dramatic and theatrical quality about it, you can't help but ask what this beauty does! Likewise if you’re a café owner and thinking of having a brew bar, this is a great way to visually let your customers know about your filter coffee as well as offer really consistent and tasty brews.  You could even have 2 or 3 set up for different origins or brew methods because the cone shaped opening at the top fits a Hario V60 (02) and Chemex filter paper perfectly.  Again, your customers will be wanting to try a brew from this!

If you're interested, check the Trinity One out here at Coffee Hit (UK).

Extra Notes:

To make coldbrew in the Trinity, just put 40 grams of coffee in the chamber, and fill it with cold filtered water. Be sure to check the valve is closed. Then leave for 4-6 hours and open the valve to release your brew! 

Espresso Tips (and a video on How to make a good Flat White)

Watch Video Below (and Subscribe)

What IS a flatwhite? 

Flatwhites are made with a double espresso in a 5-5.5oz cup with heated textured milk. The origin is debatable whether it's from NZ or Australia... but since Australia claims most good things and I'm a kiwi, can we side with my country this time on this gem please?!  

The milk should be smooth, creamy and have s velvety texture. The milk should be thinner than a latte and "flatter" in head volume.

A flatwhite should be a short, strong tasting coffee with milk. Thats why its so good! 

Espresso TIPS

  • Use good quality specialty coffee beans – often found at a good independent café (or you can order some from my online shop here)
  • Your grind should be fine, more like fine sand than a powder (Turkish)
  • Your coffee should look dark, thick in consistency and trail down like a mousetail (thick at the top and taper down).
  • Espresso should extract at an even speed – not too fast, not too slow
  • When your espresso starts to look thinner and more watery, “blonde” (a lighter browny/yellow) or starts to “pulse”, wait a second or two and switch the water flow off.

You want your espresso to have a balanced taste and flavour. 

Recipe guide

  • 18-20g Ground Coffee in (I use these scales)
  • 30g liquid coffee out
  • 25-30seconds

Like all recipes this is a guide only. The biggest problem when your espresso isn't extracting well, is the grind size. Especially at home, many people don't realise their grind is still far too coarse. I would suggest grinding your coffee finer than you would normally think to, if not just to see what happens. Invest in a good espresso grinder (quite different to a filter grinder). 

If your grind is very fine, and is running very slow, then you have two options:

  1. Lower your dose (don't put so much in the porterfilter)
  2. Or slightly coarsen your grind

Do the opposite of this if your espresso is running too quickly.  Only do one of these two options at a time so you can see what difference it makes. 

Milk TIPs:

My next blog...

The Worlds Easiest guide on How to grind coffee

How to grind coffee at home

Of course there are variations, but the easiest way to get your "perfect grind" is to turn the dial of whatever you are using to both extremes to "fine" or "course" and grind about 5 grams of beans of both extremes - just to test it out. Then you will know by seeing and doing, how your grinder actually works. This can be applied to all hand and electric grinders. It's just an interesting thing to do. As a barista, I would do this in the cafe too, if I got a new grinder. You need to see how sensitive the grinder is, and how it works. 

This is a diagram I came up with that I think most simply represents whatever grinder you are using:

Fine = Espresso Coffee                                                                                                                            

Medium = filter coffee (V60, Aeropress etc)                                                                                           

Course = Cafetiere/French Press Coffee                            

Examples of different GRINd sizes

You can see that there is a "window of variance". You should be able to change your dial in the direction of “course” or “fine” which is within the “variance” to safely fit whatever desired brew method you want. By experimenting within this 'window of variance' it should help you better gauge your grinder more quickly.

Coffee is subjective, but if you can get familiar with what coffee grind gets you to that cup that you like (within the window of variance) then you can play around with other variables (such as dosage or water volume)

Grinders I recommend & use at home

  • The Hario V60 Electric Grinder has just come out and it's awesome! It's one of the few home electric grinders at home that is simple to use, but is very accurate. You'll feel like you're a real barista at home! Check it out. I also have a product review here.  
  • Hario V60 Electric Grinder YouTube VLOG here.
  • I also use the Hario Mini Mill which I've had for years. I take it with me when I'm travelling to ensure I always have freshly ground coffee! I love its quality and accuracy. 
  • I also have the Baraza Encore electric grinder. It's very basic and simple to use. 

*To try a 250g bag of MY TGITC COFFEE BEANS click here

 

Some Tips:

  • Start with one recipe first. Then only experiment with your grind size for your first few 5 or so coffee brews. You will hit a sweet spot.
  • When making a single cup V60: once you have hit your optimum volume weight (250g-280g) try to aim for your hot water to finish draining at around 3 minutes.

EG: If you’ve poured all your hot water to reach a 280g, and its only taken you 2 minutes, then try turning your dial (1-2 clicks) slightly towards fine. Then your next brew should take slightly longer to filter. 

  • You can start playing around with dosage (amount of coffee beans in) and yield (end weight of your cup of coffee) after you have a better understanding of how to grind your coffee.
  • Make sure you regularly clean your grinders (both electric and handgrinders)

The best thing to do is have a go! Play and feel free to get in touch. 

*Exclusive handmade ceramic TGITC collab with  Studio LVU V60's

*Exclusive handmade ceramic TGITC collab with Studio LVU V60's