Trinity One 3 in 1 Brewer review

Coming from the other side of the world (New Zealand), I tend to be interested in innovative new products that get exported over here and for a while now, I’ve had my eye on the Trinity One that was designed by Mark Folker in Brisbane, Australia (still the southern hemisphere…) and I’ve wondered where to get it from in the UK.  A while back I saw them on kickstarter, and they obviously they got a good response!

Joyfully I found out Coffee Hit here in the UK are now distributing them, so I got my barista hands on an early edition to preview and review for you!

The Trinity One (I’ll shorten it to just ‘Trinity’ in this blog) is essentially a 3-in-1 filter coffee brewer, that looks reminiscent of an ‘espresso’ machine because it comes with a ‘portafilter’ handle, which is pretty cool. It triples as a pour over V60/chemex brewer, Press Brewer (like an Aeropress), and small batch cold brewer (see end of blog for quick easy recipe).

The portafilter handle has a few functions, so it’s not just for a cool look! When you turn the handle left or right, it actually opens and closes a valve, which holds or releases brewed coffee through into your vessel. How the Trinity works is that you put your coffee in the chamber and pour hot water in either using the pour over method, or like an aeropress, fill the chamber with hot water, initially making sure the porterfilter valve is closed to first saturate the coffee and water. Then using the Trinity T-shaped 2.25kg weight to ‘press’ the water through, open the valve and it will press automatically.

The T-shaped (3kg) weight is actually what I think makes this brewer unique and innovative because it forms an airtight seal against the chamber wall allowing an even, clean press, every time.  Which means a more consistent brew!  Even though I really love the Aeropress, sometimes I have to really press hard on it and I’ve had a couple where the rubber seal has gone sticky for some reason ( I think I left it in the sun…). But with this Trinity, I don’t even need to touch it, because of physics, it automatically presses the coffee through into my cup (or jug)!

And while we’re on the geeky-train, the metal frame of the Trinity is made of powder coated matte-black carbon steel, which makes it durable – and I know how cycle geeks love a bit of carbon steel! Ha!

At first I was unsure as to how to measure the water, but there is a line in the clear chamber which measures to about 250ml, perfect for one cup. If you want a stronger or weaker brew, you can amend your dose or fill above or below the line. Also the chamber is made of really durable BPA-free plastic so it can withstand high pressure and temperature, and doesn't give you any nastys - better than glass!

When you’re finished with the brew, just twist the porter filter out - similar to as you would on an espresso machine. The T-shaped weight actually pushes down on a detachable ‘n-cap’ which pops off when you take the handle out. The coffee puck will be neatly packed in the handle for you to take away and discard. It is brilliantly clean! I was super surprised with how clean the chamber is after brewing, so the clean up is minimal! I literally just wiped the bottom of the chamber and threw the grinds out. Done.

What I think is great about this brewer is that you can, not only consolidate all your coffee paraphernalia into one brewer, but it also looks slick as heck. The bamboo finish is a classy touch too. I guarantee if you have a friends over for dinner, it’ll be a topic of conversation because it has a really dramatic and theatrical quality about it, you can't help but ask what this beauty does! Likewise if you’re a café owner and thinking of having a brew bar, this is a great way to visually let your customers know about your filter coffee as well as offer really consistent and tasty brews.  You could even have 2 or 3 set up for different origins or brew methods because the cone shaped opening at the top fits a Hario V60 (02) and Chemex filter paper perfectly.  Again, your customers will be wanting to try a brew from this!

If you're interested, check the Trinity One out here at Coffee Hit (UK).

Extra Notes:

To make coldbrew in the Trinity, just put 40 grams of coffee in the chamber, and fill it with cold filtered water. Be sure to check the valve is closed. Then leave for 4-6 hours and open the valve to release your brew! 

Hario Buono Temperature controlled Kettle

VIDEO REVIEW


25% OFF HARIO Products: 

Use this code LCF2017 at checkout. 

Only Until Midnight April 12th

Water temperature is very important when brewing coffee because it affects how your coffee dissolves and ultimately the tastes. If your water is too hot or too cold it can cause your coffee to taste bitter, sour or flat.

I’ve been using the Hario buono kettle for a few years now, and I love it, so when I heard they were coming out with a temperature controlled kettle I was super excited. It’s something I’ve wanted for quite some time.

After testing and using this new Hario Buono Electric Kettle for a couple of months now, I wouldn’t really want to use anything else. It has made my brewing routine so much more convenient and accurate because it saves me waiting for my boiled water to cool down, or using a hob or kitchen kettle to transfer my heated water into a regular gooseneck kettle. The electric buono temperature controlled kettle requires almost no monitoring or double handling and you don’t need to use a thermometer spike anymore!

It essentially has three steps, so it’s really simple to use:

  1. Press "power on" button
  2. Use “up” and “down” arrows to set desired temperature
  3. Press “Keep-Warm” button

The discrete digital screen is really clear showing the temperature, alternating between the current temperature and the desired temperature it is set to (see video vlog review above).

Even though your can set your desired temperature, I generally boil my water first. So my routine for using this electric kettle has one more added step than you might choose. My mother was born in poverty stricken China where water was fetched from dirty water wells, so when she came to New Zealand as a teenager (where I was born) she was very particular about water and the impurities that might be in it. Even though the waters in NZ are some of the clearest and cleanest in the world, there were still problems like giardia in some parts, and even if it’s treated so that it’s safe to drink, you can still taste the chemicals used to clean it.

It was very important growing up to bring any water to be drunk to the boil… I think I inherited this “habit”…So to keep my conscience clear (and my mother happy), I do, boil that water first. But you don’t have to!

Luckily, the time that it takes for the water to boil, also gives you time to prepare by weighing out and grinding your coffee. Then using fresh off the boil water, I rinse my filter paper and set the kettle to my desired temperature by pressing the “keep warm” button. Water will have cooled down by then and the kettle will regulate the water automatically.

The kettle will “beep” a few times to let you know it has reached the desired set temperature.

Pressing the “up” arrow will automatically take you to 93 degrees. When you get to 96 degrees (maximum setting) and press “up” button again, it will take you back to 60 degrees. Likewise if you were at 60 degrees and pressed “down” you’d be back at 96 degrees. This is great because it cuts out button-pushing time but also allows you to set your water to a lower temperature if you use the kettle for teas too (60-96 degree range).

I think this kettle is a perfect volume too (0.8L).  It is enough to rinse your filter paper and then do a 2 cup pour-over, with out refilling, while still feeling light enough to lift  and operate, which aids with pouring.

Other kettles are often clunky or heavy to handle. I have tried other electric gooseneck kettles and regular kettles with a gooseneck spout and while they are all quite sufficient, there is something really unique about the design of the Hario Kettle spout. Maybe it’s the angle or the diameter of the Hario spout, which gives you more control, precision and safety.  I also find the handle really comfortable and allows my small hands to have a firm grip! The Japanese really do prove why their reputation for efficient form and function is so good.

I have seen an older version of this electric kettle, which had a flick switch instead of buttons and was apparently still good, but not temperature controlled. It took water to the boil only. I think this newer model is definitely superior as the old model seemed to have a light on one side that told you when it was boiled but if you were left handed you couldn’t have the kettle facing the other way around.

Because this newer model is 360 degrees rotatable, and all the settings are on the base which can always face outwards, it doesn’t matter which hand you are more comfortable using.

Another thing that’s handy is if you leave your kettle on afterwards, it will turn itself off if unused for a period of time. Likewise, if you turn it on to boil and there’s no water in it, it will turn itself off too! So it’s super safe.

The base is light, minimal and space efficient so it takes up little room on your bench or café counter.  The cord can be wound underneath the base to shorten so you don’t have long wires sprawled on the bench, or alternatively if you need to pack it away to transport.

I like to try keep factors the same (ie: dose, grind, temperature) and only change one thing at a time to see what makes a difference to my brew. It not only looks slick but on a practical sense it means I have more control over my brew recipe and method. All in all I’m super happy with my Buono Kettle, and I would definitely recommend it for home and café use.

Here’s a link if you want to check it out further. Here 

Ps: If you have the original Buono kettle, don't worry, I checked out Hario's site, and they seperately sell a lid with a temperature controlled spike built into it. But if you're like me, I'd opt for both - one for home and one for travel or camping! 

 

TGITC V60 Simple Brew Recipe:

  • 18g coffee
  • 250ml hot water (94 degrees)
  • 3 minutes

Rinse your filter paper. Then grind coffee into the cone and slowly pour hot water in a circular motion into the coffee. The coffee will bloom, and when it starts to drop, keep topping it up with water until 250mls of water has passed through. It should take approximately 3 minutes to complete. 

Relax & Enjoy...

Also check out the TGITC online store for lots of great coffee products here. 

 

"COFFEE BLOOM" Greeting & Gift Cards

"COFFEE BLOOM"

I’m so excited to release this exclusive TGITC in collaboration with MR Studio London!

** “Coffee Bloom” Definition: “The bloom is the part of the coffee brewing process in which the gasses from the coffee are released as the water hits the grinds. It causes the grinds to grow & rise. The CO2 that is inside the bean is purged out and replaced with the water and begins the brewing/extraction process.” [from The Roasters Pack blog ]

I’ve known MR Studio for about a year now. I met them by making coffee for them at my pop up café in Leytonstone last year so naturally our mutual love for coffee made us instant friends, plus I became a fan of their work ever since I first laid my eyes on it! They have been producing amazing, unique work since about 2012 and work on both private commissions and larger commercial projects too.  You need to check them out (and their cute cat 'Chicken").

I have often looked for a blank greeting card to give to one coffee lover from another - that isn’t a cartoon with something referring to "decaf". I wanted something beautiful and I love a clever word play, so it made sense to us to collaborate and work together on something a little special and different. The result? This beautiful “Coffee Bloom” blank gift card. 

These blank cards are prints made from dried and pressed flora, fauna and foliage that MR Studio has personally cultivated and/or foraged for in the wilderness. That is why there is such a vast range of species in their work - some you'll have never heard of or seen before. Their art and designs are so intricate and delicate, yet almost dream-like.

Available exclusively from The Girl in the Café webshop, it’s perfect to go with any coffee related gift this Christmas or just on its own for someone who appreciates coffee and the beauty of flowers.  

MR Studio currently have a Market Stand this weekend at the Christmas Makers Market, East Village. It's the LAST weekend to go, so go check it out all their other beautiful cards, prints and gifts. Such beautiful and unique xmas presents and cards for this Xmas.

Christmas Makers Market
6-9 West Park Walk
East Villiage
E20 1DL

The Worlds Easiest guide on How to grind coffee

How to grind coffee at home

Of course there are variations, but the easiest way to get your "perfect grind" is to turn the dial of whatever you are using to both extremes to "fine" or "course" and grind about 5 grams of beans of both extremes - just to test it out. Then you will know by seeing and doing, how your grinder actually works. This can be applied to all hand and electric grinders. It's just an interesting thing to do. As a barista, I would do this in the cafe too, if I got a new grinder. You need to see how sensitive the grinder is, and how it works. 

This is a diagram I came up with that I think most simply represents whatever grinder you are using:

Fine = Espresso Coffee                                                                                                                            

Medium = filter coffee (V60, Aeropress etc)                                                                                           

Course = Cafetiere/French Press Coffee                            

Examples of different GRINd sizes

You can see that there is a "window of variance". You should be able to change your dial in the direction of “course” or “fine” which is within the “variance” to safely fit whatever desired brew method you want. By experimenting within this 'window of variance' it should help you better gauge your grinder more quickly.

Coffee is subjective, but if you can get familiar with what coffee grind gets you to that cup that you like (within the window of variance) then you can play around with other variables (such as dosage or water volume)

Grinders I recommend & use at home

  • The Hario V60 Electric Grinder has just come out and it's awesome! It's one of the few home electric grinders at home that is simple to use, but is very accurate. You'll feel like you're a real barista at home! Check it out. I also have a product review here.  
  • Hario V60 Electric Grinder YouTube VLOG here.
  • I also use the Hario Mini Mill which I've had for years. I take it with me when I'm travelling to ensure I always have freshly ground coffee! I love its quality and accuracy. 
  • I also have the Baraza Encore electric grinder. It's very basic and simple to use. 

*To try a 250g bag of MY TGITC COFFEE BEANS click here

 

Some Tips:

  • Start with one recipe first. Then only experiment with your grind size for your first few 5 or so coffee brews. You will hit a sweet spot.
  • When making a single cup V60: once you have hit your optimum volume weight (250g-280g) try to aim for your hot water to finish draining at around 3 minutes.

EG: If you’ve poured all your hot water to reach a 280g, and its only taken you 2 minutes, then try turning your dial (1-2 clicks) slightly towards fine. Then your next brew should take slightly longer to filter. 

  • You can start playing around with dosage (amount of coffee beans in) and yield (end weight of your cup of coffee) after you have a better understanding of how to grind your coffee.
  • Make sure you regularly clean your grinders (both electric and handgrinders)

The best thing to do is have a go! Play and feel free to get in touch. 

*Exclusive handmade ceramic TGITC collab with  Studio LVU V60's

*Exclusive handmade ceramic TGITC collab with Studio LVU V60's

“North East by Southwest”

AROUND THE WORLD IN 8 WEEKS

Here's what happened...

For eight weeks I curated a host of world coffees at Stone & Crow. I started in London with Alchemy Coffee Roasters (which was available throughout the duration) then I featured:


Week 1: Nomad Coffee (Barcelona)

Week 2: Five Elephants (Berlin)

Week 3: Coffee Supreme Melbourne (Australia)

Week 4: Coutume Coffee Roasters (Paris)

Week 5: DoubleShot (Prague) 

Week 6: Reunion Island (Toronto)

Week 7: Rich Coffee Roasters (New Zealand)

then finished with my last weekend in London using a few of my favourite London roasters…

What an incredible 8 weeks I had at Stone & Crow.

Leytonstone has been my home for the past couple of months and an amazing place to hold my pop up café. The local community have been incredibly supportive. I really enjoyed meeting so many locals and others from around London, making you coffee and discussing all sorts of coffee and non-coffee related stuff with you!

I really hope over the past few weeks I was able to introduce some new ideas as well as provide access to some top-grade coffees that London has never had before. There were so many interesting coffees, I was blown away with everyone that I had and worked with.

Look out for these roasters, as they are all developing and doing some really interesting work in the coffee world and remember coffee makes a great xmas prezzy! 

In my last weekend I finished off Around the world in 8 weeks in “LONDON”.

As I love film, my concept for the last weekend paid homage to Leytonstone’s most famous resident, Alfred Hitchcock. It also gave me an excuse to have some of my favourite London roasters in the hopper.

I called the London-Weekend “North East by Southwest” after Alfred Hitchcock’s famous film “North by Northwest”.

North: Vagabond Coffee

East: Squaremile Coffee

Southwest: Alchemy Coffee

 

NORTH LONDON: Vagabond

Having three locations (N7, N5, E1) I got my coffee from their Holloway Rd (N7) café/roastery. It was a nice place to visit with the roaster out the back of the café where you can dine in whilst watching them roast. As an espresso I used “Balzac’s cup” which was a blend of Brazilian and Columbian coffee. Having not worked with their coffee before, I really enjoyed using it. It made for a juicy and smooth cup, which was easy to drink with milk and lovely as an espresso.  I was especially impressed by their Ethiopian Guji that I ran as a batch brew. It was so good - sweet, super clean and tasty. People really enjoyed it.

East London: Squaremile

Most of you will know Squaremile to be one of the best roasters in London and for good reason. But rather than get their house blend “Red Brick”, I asked them to get me what ever they thought was their “best”, so they sent me their Kenyan Espresso Kangunu AA (the AA refers to bean size which is bigger than other beans). Kenyan AA is typically very good so it was a bit special to have. I came in early and had a play around with different doses and grinds and got it where I thought it should be - it tasted great! It’s quite different using a Kenyan as a single origin espresso. I often enjoy blends because you can use the different origins to bring out certain profiles in an espresso, but this was really interesting to drink and probably a little different from what most other places are using in cafes around London. It tasted of deep red fruits but was quite light and bright at the same time. A very tasty number!

SouthWest London: Alchemy Coffee

Alchemy coffee is one of my favourite roasters in London. They first caught my attention a few years ago with their Guatemalan range – they source some of the best guats I’ve tasted. So of course I used a Guatemalan single origin of theirs from San Sebastian.  It didn't disappoint. It was beautiful, and again quite bright but with caramel undertones that gave it a nice finish with milk. Incidentally, I had Alchemy coffee on throughout the duration of my pop up as filter coffee as well as the other coffees I was using from around the world. I was particularly fond of their costa rican brewed in various ways; batch brew, V60, Chemex and aeropress. Their El Salvador is good too.  Alchemy coffee roasters are super easy and accommodating to work with.  I really enjoyed using their coffee at my pop up regularly and I find their coffee consistently reliable. We have a good laugh and they seem to put up with my regular questions and general cheekiness.

I can honestly highly recommend all of the roasters I used during this time, so if you do happen to be in any of those countries or cities, do look for them as you’ll be able to reliably drink them. I know only too well how hard it can be when you’re travelling, need coffee but don’t know the good local coffee suppliers – so I hope this helps when you’re in Barcelona (Spain), Berlin (Germany), Melbourne (Australia), Paris (France), Prague(Czech Republic), Toronto (Canada), Wellington (New Zealand) and of course, for those who were only able to follow the journey via social media, London! (when you visit)

Karma Cola were dope too, as I had their deliciously fun sodas at my popup. They’re such a great company and do amazing work not only through their products but their philanthropic work too which is award-winning (See my earlier blog on them here). I really appreciate their support and encouragement for me and my work too. I love working with such great people and companies with great products. 

Without Julian from Stone & Crow it wouldn't have happened. It was wicked to work with him and I'm super grateful to him for welcoming me into his amazing space. Every week I would come in to find him running around like an excited animal with all the new (vintage) things he had acquired. There was always a story or a history to tell about each item. Julian has a great eye and cool taste. He has an amazing knowledge of vintage furniture and artwork which was awesome to be around and chat about. Super generous, I couldn't have done this without him. I had so much fun.

The biggest thanks goes to so many of you for popping in and to Leytonstone. It’s always great to see people come visit from around London and see friends and people in the coffee/hospitality industry, I really appreciate your time and the love. An absolute pleasure. It's the first time since my Soho days that I really felt such an amazing supportive community. I got real buzz from seeing you and I’m grateful for your support – in person and online. Thank you.

Stay tuned, for my webseries and more cool stuff coming soon. I know its been ages, but sometimes, good things take time.

Peace out xx

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